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Cryptography

Modern cryptography plays an integral role in every aspect of online and electronic security, including providing evidence you're speaking to the intended party and hindering spying on the subsequent communication. Cutting-edge cryptography tools will allow the creation of incredibly strong evidence that general information processing has been performed in a privacy-preserving and trustless way.

Publications about Cryptography

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2020.1.15 / Report
Single Secret Leader Election
In a Single Secret Leader Election (SSLE), a group of participants aim to randomly choose exactly one leader from the group with the restriction that the identity of the leader will be known to the chosen leader and nobody else.
2019.8.24 / Report
PLONK: Permutations over Lagrange-bases for Oecumenical Noninteractive arguments of Knowledge
zk-SNARK constructions that utilize an updatable universal structured reference string remove one of the main obstacles in deploying zk-SNARKs[GKM + ]. The important work of Maller et al. [MBKM19] presented Sonic-the first potentially practical zk-SNARK with fully succinct verification for general arithmetic circuits with such an SRS.
2019.5.29 / Report
AuroraLight: Improved prover efficiency and SRS size in a Sonic-like system
Using ideas from the recent Aurora zk-STARK of Ben-Sasson et al. [BCR + 19], we present a zk-SNARK with a universal and updatable SRS similar to the recent construction of Maller et al.
2018.10.15 / Report
Scaling Proof-of-Replication for Filecoin Mining
A proof-of-replication (PoRep) is a proof system that a server can use to demonstrate to a network in a publicly verifiable way that it is dedicating unique resources to storing one or more replicas of a data file.
2018.7.14 / Report
PoReps: Proofs of Space on Useful Data
A proof-of-replication (PoRep) is an interactive proof system in which a prover defends a publicly verifiable claim that it is dedicating unique resources to storing one or more retrievable replicas of a data file.
2017.8.31 / Thesis
Decentralized Infrastructure for File Storage
How might we incentivize a peer-to-peer network to store users’ files? The purpose of this research is to combine ideas from existing peer-to-peer file sharing systems, blockchain technology and Proofs-of-Storage to create an incentivized decentralized storage network, where every participant can earn a reward for storing and serving files or pay the network to store or retrieve their own.
2017.7.27 / Report
Power Fault Tolerance
Byzantine Fault Tolerance (BFT) accounts for faults as the number of faulty nodes and is thus cumbersome to apply to many modern decentralized systems. We introduce the Power Fault Tolerance (PFT) model, which reframes BFT in terms of participants’ influence over the outcome of a protocol, instead of the number of nodes.
2017.7.27 / Report
Proof of Replication
We introduce Proof-of-Replication (PoRep), a new kind of Proof-of-Storage, that can be used to prove that some data D has been replicated to its own uniquely dedicated physical storage. Enforcing unique physical copies enables a verifier to check that a prover is not deduplicating multiple copies of D into the same storage space.
2017.7.19 / Report
Filecoin: A Decentralized Storage Network
The internet is in the middle of a revolution: centralized proprietary services are being replaced with decentralized open ones; trusted parties replaced with verifiable computation; brittle location addresses replaced with resilient content addresses; inefficient monolithic services replaced with peer-to-peer algo-rithmic markets.
2014.7.15 / Report
Filecoin: A Cryptocurrency Operated File Storage Network
Filecoin is a distributed electronic currency similar to Bitcoin. Unlike Bitcoin's computation-only proof-of-work, Filecoin's proof-of-work function includes a proof-of-retrievability component, which requires nodes to prove they store a particular file. The Filecoin network forms an entirely distributed file storage system, whose nodes are incentivized to store as much of the entire network's data as they can.