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Anca Nitulescu

Research Scientist / CryptoNetLab

Education

PhD in Cryptography, 2019

École normale supérieure

Parisian Master of Research in Computer Science, 2014

Université Paris Diderot (Paris VII)

Master's in Mathematics, 2013

University of Bucharest

Bachelor's in Mathematics, 2011

University of Bucharest

Anca is a cryptographer working on research problems related to Filecoin.

Anca holds a Ph.D. in Cryptography from École Normale Supérieure Paris (ENS) under the supervision of David Pointcheval and Dario Fiore (IMDEA, Madrid). Their PhD subject revolved around SNARKs, a tool to prove integrity for results of Delegated Computation. They were a visiting assistant researcher at Columbia University, USA working with Rosario Gennaro and Mariana Raykova on Verifiable Computation topics. They also completed a postdoc at Aarhus University on topics related to authentication primitives and theoretical aspects of SNARKs.

Their main research interests are cryptographic proving systems, especially zero-knowledge proofs and succinct arguments of knowledge (SNARKs).

Areas of Expertise

Verifiable Computation, Proving systems (SNARKs, zero-knowledge proofs), Authentication primitives

Talks

2021.1.26
Verifiable computation on encrypted data
Protocol Labs Research Talks / 2021.01.26

Publications

2021.5.13 / Conference paper
SnarkPack: Practical SNARK aggregation
Zero-knowledge SNARKs (zk-SNARKs) are non-interactive proof systems with short and efficiently verifiable proofs. zk-SNARKs are widely used in decentralised systems to address privacy and scalability concerns. One of the main applications is the blockchain, were SNARKs are used to prove computations with private inputs and reduce on-chain footprint verification and transaction sizes.
ZKProof Workshop / 2021.04.21
2021.3.18 / Report
Rinocchio: SNARKs for ring arithmetic
Succinct non-interactive arguments of knowledge (SNARKs) enable non-interactive efficient verification of NP computations and admit short proofs. However, all current SNARK constructions assume that the statements to be proven can be efficiently represented as either Boolean or arithmetic circuits over finite fields.
Chaya Ganesh, Anca Nitulescu , Eduardo Soria-Vazquez